18th Aug 201400:39168 notes
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lostsplendor:

Philadelphia, 1947 via Imgur
16th Aug 201401:51275 notes
thehollowsquare:

touraine, marc riboud
16th Aug 201401:4940 notes
enchantedsleeper:

Falling Stars, Mihály Zichy 
16th Aug 201401:3499 notes
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Van Gogh - Roses, detail
16th Aug 201401:32117,180 notes
fooloptionboads:

MANUFACTURE ROUBAISIENNE CYCLES
14th Aug 201400:06133 notes

Angelica Huston photographed by Richard Avedon, 1976.
14th Aug 201400:058,493 notes
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13th Aug 201423:571,209 notes

medievalpoc:

elledwarfhunter submitted to medievalpoc:

Abu ‘l-Qasim Khalaf ibn ‘Abbas al-Zahrawi (ca 936–1013(?)) was a Muslim surgeon living in Cordoba under the Umayyad dynasty.

Al-Zahrawi was the first to describe an ectopic pregnancy as well as the first person to figure out that there was a hereditary component to hemophilia. He wrote a medical treatise based on his study of ancient Greek medical texts and his own personal experience, He intended his text, titled kitab al-tasrif li-man ‘ajiza ‘an al-ta’ alif, to be a compendium of medical knowledge for its reader. It included all facets of medicine including descriptions of diseases, treatments, medicines and useful herbs and minerals. Its most famous chapter was “On Surgery and Instruments.”

During the Middle Ages, al-Zahrawi was revered along with other luminaries such as Galen as one of the father’s of medicine and his text served as one of the foundational texts for surgery.

Unlike other medical works, his text is actually fairly straight forward. He does not bury his ideas beneath mounds of philosophy or theology. As a consequence, it became immensely popular with would be doctors and surgeons. His text also helped to raise the status of surgery in medieval Europe from being perceived as a lowly, menial trade to ultimately becoming a medical specialty.

His surgical text included a number of illustrations of surgical tools. Some were based on Ancient Greek and Roman designs while others were al-Zahrawi’s own invention. His cephalotribes— a tool designed by al-Zahrawi to be used in extracting a dead fetus from the uterus—for example are quite close to the forceps that would be designed by Hugh Chamberlen in the 19th century.

[mod note] You can read more here at muslimheritage.com.

decepticun:

Enjoy the traditional life of China | by Sixie Lee.
11th Aug 201401:1010,363 notes
hazor:

American soldier kissing his English girlfriend on lawn in Hyde Park, one of the favorite haunts of US troops stationed in England.
by Ralph Morse | London, United Kingdom, May 1944
11th Aug 201401:072,552 notes

Titan aka the Mermaid Moon
11th Aug 201401:05204,943 notes
Opaque  by  andbamnan